Plan your treks

Bhutan is the place where you do not meet a westerner every hundred meters, and pass through truly wild countryside.

There are few things to consider before choosing which of Bhutan’s spectacular to embarks.

When to go

The first thing to consider while planning your trek is the weather.

BEST TIMES

March – April (spring), September – November (autumn)

Best overall season with frequent blue skies and dazzling views. The bright sun makes for pleasant daytime temperature upwards of 20 degrees C falling to around 4 degrees C at night. Mornings are crisp clear and spectacular starry skies.

December and February: Winter is time to tackle the lowland treks. Like Nabji Trek and Saga La Trek.

About trekking in Bhutan

Trekking in Bhutan is an experience full of awe and wonder. All treks climb up and down the hills, passing through various vegetation zones with a great variety of flora and fauna. All most all treks in the kingdom are in protected areas providing you the best chance to see wildlife in its native habitat. Variety of rhododendrons will decorate your trails, the chirping of different birds will be the music to ears and various species of butterflies will be the feast to your eyes besides the snow-covered peaks.

The variety of trek ranges from a simple three days trek to the legendary 25 days Snowman’s trek. The Snowman’s trek is considered as the world’s toughest trek as it goes over almost 12 mountain passes and each of them measures over 4500 meters above sea level. The number of days can be shortened to suit your luxury of time and temperament. But then one must be prepared to walk.

OUR TREKKING GUIDE

We have experience reliable and service-oriented professional trekking guide. Our guides receive annual training in emergency first aid and Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS).

CAMP STAFF

Each trek group is accompanied by a support team consisting of a trained guide, trek chef, assistant guides and local horsemen. Trekking is a joint effort and every staff has an important role to play including the horsemen.

About trekking in Bhutan

Trekking in Bhutan is an experience full of awe and wonder. All treks climb up and down the hills, passing through various vegetation zones with a great variety of flora and fauna. All most all treks in the kingdom are in protected areas providing you the best chance to see wildlife in its native habitat. Variety of rhododendrons will decorate your trails, the chirping of different birds will be the music to ears and various species of butterflies will be the feast to your eyes besides the snow-covered peaks.

The variety of trek ranges from a simple three days trek to the legendary 25 days Snowman’s trek. The Snowman’s trek is considered as the world’s toughest trek as it goes over almost 12 mountain passes and each of them measures over 4500 meters above sea level. The number of days can be shortened to suit your luxury of time and temperament. But then one must be prepared to walk.

OUR TREKKING GUIDE

We have experience reliable and service-oriented professional trekking guide. Our guides receive annual training in emergency first aid and Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS).

CAMP STAFF

Each trek group is accompanied by a support team consisting of a trained guide, trek chef, assistant guides and local horsemen. Trekking is a joint effort and every staff has an important role to play including the horsemen.

What is accommodation like during the trek?

You will sleep in a tent, with foam pads placed on the floor as a mattress and your sleeping bag. The assistants walk ahead of the trekking group each day and pitch tents before the trekkers arrive. A hot cup of tea waiting in the dining tent is a most welcome treat after hours of tedious walk. our guide will bring you a bowl of warm water each morning to wash with.

Along with some treks such as Merak Sakteng and Nabji treks, you have the opportunity to stay in a village homestay.

MEALS ON TREK

The food that our camp staffs conjure up each day is generally of such quality and quantity. Fresh meats and vegetables brought from the start of trek usually last for a week. We then depend on canned foods. Wherever a trek passes through villages, our staff will buy fresh vegetables from the local.

Our trekking chefs are trained and certified by the government and they can conjure up tasty and nutritious food at every campsite at any altitude. Most trekkers find camp meals better than ones served in city hotels. We use stoves fueled by gas stored in metal containers to cook your camp meals. This makes cooking faster and clean. Besides their native foods, our cooks can prepare Chinese, Indian and continental dishes. Fresh meat may be served first two nights, and can fruits cocktails are often thrown in for dessert. All you need to bring is a few muesli bars and a slab of chocolate for more support.

If you have special dietary needs, our chefs can look after it with advance information. Just make sure you tell us in advance of any dietary restrictions you may.

Break Fast

Generally starts with tea or coffee and moves on to cereal, porridge, jam toast, egg juice with unlimited instant coffee and sometimes additional proteins such as sausages and hams. Oatmeal, drinking chocolates, baked beans, and peanut butter are also served.

Lunch

Lunch is usually prepared at breakfast time and packed beforehand in a thermos style metal container with a flask of hot tea. This hot packed lunch consists of rice, nodules, vegetables, meat, fruits, boiled egg or potatoes and juices.

Evening tea

In the evening at the campsite almost immediately after your arrival, tea/coffee is served with biscuits and at times with peanuts or salted popcorn while the cook prepares your dinner.

Dinner

The biggest meal of the day, dinner usually begins with soup, followed by the main course including meat (chicken, fish, pork or beef) and vegetables, which are accompanied by either white or local red rice. You will also be served with fruits and tea/coffee. Sometimes steamed dumplings with a vegetable or meat filling and thukpa, a noodle soup would also be served. If you wish, you can also opt for ‘emadatse’, as a side dish, which is simply made of cheese and chilies.

Water on Trek

You will be supplied with bottled mineral water on the first day. Subsequent days, your trek assistants will collect water from the rivers and streams along the trail. They will boil for you at the start of the day to carry in your water bottles. If you collect water yourself from streams, purify it using your tablets.

Personal equipment checklist

Clothing

*down or fiber-filled jacket
*jumper or piled jacket
*hiking shorts (for men) and skirts
*waterproof jacket or poncho or umbrella
*hiking pants
*T-shirts or blouses
*long sleeved shirt
*underwear

Footwear

*trekking or running shoes
*camp shoes or thongs or sandals
*socks (polypropylene)

Other Equipment

*daypack
*sleeping bag ( down-filled for high –altitude treks)
*water bottle (preferably metal to cool boiling water)
*flashlight or head torch and spare batteries

Miscellaneous Items

*toiletries
*toilet paper
*pocket knife
*sunscreen (SPF 15+ or 30+)
*travel towel
* biodegradable laundry soap
*medical and first- aid kit
*water filtration or chemical purification
*sewing kit
*bandana
*sunglasses
*sunscreen
*binoculars
*books for long evening
*duffel bag with a padlock, a few stuff sacks and plastic bags
*trekking poles

Photography Equipment

*camera and lenses
*spare batteries

For treks above 4000 meters

Clothing

*insulated pants
*nylon windbreaker
*nylon wind pants
*long underwear
*woolen hat or balaclava
*gloves
*gaiters
*Down-or fiber – filled jacket
*Mountain trekking boots